Wednesday, May 26, 2010

Interesting Read...

Backpacker Photo School: Better Flyfishing Photos

"Tips from the expert: We interviewed Tim Romano to get some tips and tricks for improving flyfishing photos."













Article can be found HERE...from www.backpacker.com

It's Great Having Friends...

Make sure you check out our friend Joel's site...







Awesome Art, Pictures, and Information...

Newly added to the side bar...

Monday, May 24, 2010

Interesting Fact...

LINK TO THIS COMIC - FUNNY!!!


LINK TO OATMEAL
Thanks to Nikki for the link...

Sunday, May 23, 2010

Weekly Update...Brownie Edition...

Well, the week started off decent…then slowly went to shit on a few personal levels…but bound and determined to leave the world behind, my lovely wife and dog decided to join me in our first camping trip of the year. It was a bit impromptu, but we were happy to go…

Mission a success…

In pictures…


Finn's comfortable in camp...

The weekend sleeping arrangements, with welcome guest!


Some of PA's Best...

Buggy Drive Down Stream...

Finn and Mommy looking for risers...

Amy nymphing a run...

Finn waiting streamside...

PA 'bows...mmmm

Gotta love the stockers...

Classic U-bend...

Now for the best part of the weekend...the MASSIVE tank that I somehow coaxed out of a deep corner pool...

Long story, but I ended up having to land it alone, without a net...which was NOT an easy task. Amazing fish...gorgeous colorings...something that won't be forgotten...

Guesses floating around at the moment are around 23"...

No hatches really materialized due to some bad weather, but fish seemed to be happy eating nymphs...

The best part is that we're back next weekend to get into the action...

Hopefully we've got more stories and pictures to share. Weather outlook seems to have some good dry fly weather...but you never know...fingers crossed...we will anxiously wait...

'Til next time...

Sunday, May 16, 2010

Weekly Update...

Well, it was a quiet week. Imagine that...

Last weekend's success in CT was followed with a rough start to the week. Too many chores...and preparing for another suicide trip into NYC...

Long story...fished for a few hours on Sunday for bass. Though they're all over the ponds starting to bed, the lips are starting to lock...which I prefer anyways...

Now that we've gotten most of the non-fishing trip out of the way...there should be some better fishing stories and pictures coming through. Possible PA camping trip this weekend, followed by a long weekend away in Potter...

Friday, May 14, 2010

Also...

To go with Thursday's post...

New video highlighting Boz's steelhead trip out West...



this and many more can be found on Flies & Fins website...

Thursday, May 13, 2010

Jealous...

check out http://www.maineriverguides.com/ -

Some great easrly season fishing going on in Maine this year...



Check out Boz's site for updated pictures and reports as the season progresses...

And yes, we're still jealous...

Wednesday, May 12, 2010

Micky Finn

Interesting history on the Micky Finn:

"The information provided on the Mickey Finn especially interested me because it had details I was not aware of on the origin of this fly. Part of the appeal of fly-tying is not only crafting your own flies for fishing but also the history of some of the fly patterns and how they came to be.

I always knew that the Mickey Finn fly, which is a streamer tied with a silver body and red and yellow bucktail for a wing, had a long and illustrious history. It is an old pattern but continues to be a favourite among trout and salmon anglers to this day. Its popularity is probably due to the fact that it catches fish, even if it doesn’t represent anything in nature.

In the stamp booklet it claims that the fly was first tied by a Quebec fly-tier, Charles Langevin, in the 19th century. First known as the Langevin its name was later changed to the Assassin. I knew about the Assassin fly and how it was popularized by outdoor writer John Alden Knight. Knight is famous for his development of the Solunar Tables, which outline the best times for hunting and fishing based on lunar cycles.

The effectiveness of the fly for catching trout prompted Greg Clark, well-known Canadian writer whose column ran in the Star Weekly for years, to proclaim, after being on a fishing trip with Knight, that the fly was as effective as a Mickey Finn. Now, at that time the Mickey Finn was a famous drink, developed in New Orleans in the 1920s, that was very potent because it contained narcotics of some sort. As the story goes, famed actor Rudolph Valentino died from drinking too many Mickey Finns while at a hotel in New York and the term, slipping someone a Mickey, comes from that event.

Greg Clark’s renaming of the fly as the Mickey Finn stuck and Knight continued to popularize the fly through his writings in the 1930s and 40s. Time hasn’t dimmed its effectiveness and it continues to be one of the most popular streamers for trout and salmon in North America. I like to use it for sea trout in the spring but I also use it, in larger sizes, for salmon in the fall."

Full article from http://www.capebretonpost.com/ (Don MacLean) FULL LINK


Monday, May 10, 2010

Weekly Update...

Up at 6 Friday…

Work for 8 Hours…

Home to pack and get on the road…

9 hours of driving, asleep by 2:30AM…

Up at 5 and on the water by 6:15 AM…

All worth it!

Not the spectacular dry fly fishing that this river is noted for…lots of rain/thunder all morning…but they couldn’t seem to resist the soft hackles…

I ended the morning with 3 brookies…all over 11”, 2 browns, and one rainbow…the Connecticut slam! I’ll take it.

With family obligations, I was only able to fish Saturday AM, but it felt awesome getting some of my first trout of the season…

No bassing this week, but we plan to remedy that in the next few days…

Pics...
















With all the storms and rain, the camera stayed under the jacket for most of the day...

Till next week...

Friday, May 7, 2010

Weekends...

For some reason, weekends in the spring get tied up with everything BUT fishing…

Last weekend was a last minute excursion to Baltimore, which was a blast…but I didn’t fish once…

Then this week, we tied some soft hackles in anticipation for this weekend…but that was about as close to a fish as I got this week…

Tonight though it all changes…

Drive at 5 for 9 hours into CT, with an ETA of 2 AM. Sleep for 3 hours, get up, and hunt the fabled hatches of North Western CT…

Winter/Summer Caddis in the AM, BWO’s with the forecasted rain, and possibly a Henny or two mixed in…

Seems like a good plan…

Anyways, hopefully you’re all getting into more fish then me this Spring…

Monday, May 3, 2010

Whales Arrive On the Vinyard Before The Bass....

"An extraordinary group of right whales — some 95 living specimens of the rarest of all large whale species — was feeding in the waters between Martha’s Vineyard and Block Island this week, while two mother and calf right whale pairs were spotted even closer to the Island."

FULL LINK:
Huge Group of Rare Whales Off Vineyard
By LAUREN MARTIN
Martha's Vineyard Gazette


Bucket List

Forbes Top 10 Fly Fishing Lodges...

1. Agua Boa Amazon Lodge, Brazil
Species: Peacock bass

In the heart of the northwest part of the Amazon basin, Agua Boa has exclusive access to its namesake river. The river boasts some of the world's best fly-fishing for peacock bass, a ferocious fish adorned in festive yellows, oranges, and greens. Anglers sight-fish shallow white-sand bars for prowling peacocks; 20-pounders are not uncommon. Caimans and jaguars will check out your cast. Guests stay in air-conditioned bungalows overlooking both a pool and the magnificent river, or on the roomy houseboat.

Weekly rate: $5,500. www.aguaboaamazonlodge.com. Book through Orvis, 800-547-4322, www.orvis.com/aguaboa


2. Alphonse Island Fishing Company, Seychelles Islands
Species: Bonefish

You'll have to travel halfway around the world to reach this remote Indian Ocean atoll about 1,000 miles east of Kenya, but it's worth it. Alphonse has some of the hottest bonefishing anywhere, particularly on the famous St. Fran├žois flat. The lodge, opened in 1999, comprises ten beachfront chalets with easy access to the atoll's collar of deserted white beaches and vibrant rain forest interior.

Weekly rate: $6,890. Book through Frontiers Travel, 800-245-1950, www.frontierstravel.com


3. the Atlantic Salmon Reserve, Kola Peninsula, Russia
Species: Atlantic salmon

When Peter Power founded the Atlantic Salmon Reserve, 2 million acres of Russian tundra 200 miles north of the Arctic Circle, his goal, he said, was to create happiness. It worked. Fishermen here cast arguably the greatest collection of Atlantic salmon water in the world: the Kharlovka, Rynda, Eastern Litza, and Zolotaya rivers. No more than 38 guests stay in well-appointed cabins, catered to by an all-Russian staff of 100. Helicopters take fishermen each morning to beats on the rivers, where 30-pound Atlantics are caught with some regularity and 40-pounders are not unknown.

Weekly rate: $3,500–$20,000. 44-186-588-3063, www.kharlovka.com


4. Bristol Bay Lodge, Bristol Bay, Alaska
Species: Pacific salmon, char, and grayling

For the quintessential "last frontier" fly-fishing experience, put Bristol Bay at the top of your life list. The lodge looks out over Lake Aleknagik, while outpost camps mix wilderness with comfort. Vintage De Havilland Beaver floatplanes fly guests to new spots daily, where they catch chinook, silver and pink salmon, arctic char, Dolly Varden, or rainbow trout--up to 70 a day.

Weekly rate: $7,350. 509-964-2094 (October–May), www.bristolbaylodge.com


5. Firehole Ranch, West Yellowstone, Montana
Species: Rainbow and brown trout

No lodge in the U.S. is better located for trout fishing. Firehole Ranch, a renovated 1947 family camp, is on Hebgen Lake, which feeds the Madison River, one of the sport's most hallowed waters. It's within an easy drive of the mighty Yellowstone River, the challenging Henry's Fork of the Snake in Idaho, and all the pilgrimage spots within Yellowstone National Park, like Slough Creek, the Gibbon, and the trout-rich river that gives the place its name. The lodge does the little things right: Everybody, from the guides to the chambermaids, knows your name from the moment you arrive.

Weekly rate: $4,775–$5,350. 407-646-7294, http://www.fireholeranch.com/


6. Kamalame Cay, Andros Island, The Bahamas
Species: Bonefish

The 96-acre very private island is a popular getaway for Hollywood types. But fishermen go for another reason: Andros' incredible bonefishing. On the Joulters flats, anglers wade barefoot on reefs topped with white sand, and cast to bones of up to 10 pounds. The lodge hosts 35 guests at time. There is a big soaking tub in each room and a spa at the end of a 200-foot pier with treatments like hibiscus wraps and coconut scrubs.


Weekly rate: $4,700–$7,000. www.kamalame.com. Book through Orvis, 800-547-4322, www.orvis.com/kamalamecay



7. Lower Dean River Lodge, British Columbia, Canada

Species: Steelhead
The Dean River hosts one of the last great runs of summer steelhead. The lodge is just 8 miles from the Pacific Ocean, so the fish--averaging between 8 and 12 pounds--are fresh and rowdy when hooked. Dry-fly-fishing, which is considered the apex of steelheading, is the norm here. Guests helicopter into the camp, composed of handmade wooden buildings and surrounded by snowcapped 8,000-foot peaks. Meals consist of local organic vegetables and wild seafood. The lodge has a 95 percent repeat booking rate.

Daily rate: $1,000. 250-847-1806, http://www.lowerdean.com/

 
8. Nomads of the Seas, Chile

Species: Rainbow, brown, and brook trout

Technically, Nomads is not a lodge, but we'll let that slide because this 150-foot luxury yacht sailing down the coast of Chile is a movable fishing fiesta. Each day, guests board a Bell 407 helicopter and are transported back in time, to virginal streams and lagoons, some of them only recently discovered, to fish for wild rainbow and brown trout. By night they dine on grouper, abalone, and crab with Chilean wine, then are rocked to sleep by an overnight cruise to new fishing grounds. The ship has an onboard spa as well as a team of naturalists.

Weekly rate: $15,000–$29,000. 56-2-414-4600, www.nomadsoftheseas.com. Book through Orvis, 800-547-3422, www.orvis.com/nomadscruise


9. Poronui, New Zealand
Species: Rainbow and brown trout

New Zealand may have the most challenging trout fishing on the planet, with huge fish that inhabit air-clear water and take only tiny, perfectly presented flies. If that is your cup of tea, Poronui, on the North Island, is your place. Fishermen are helicoptered to secret river pools. Guests stay in the main building, in separate cabins, in luxury tents on the Mohaka River, or in the Blake House, a modernist masterpiece with four bedrooms, a sauna, satellite TV, and full library. The lodge offers wine tours, horseback riding, even nanny services.

Weekly rate: $5,000–$7,000. 64-7-384-2080, www.poronui.co.nz. Book through Frontiers Travel, 800-245-1950, www.frontierstravel.com


10. Wilson's Sporting Camps, New Brunswick, Canada
Species: Atlantic salmon

With cozy cabins and copious amounts of comfort food, Wilson's captures the mellow Maritime Canada mood. This is especially true during the fall run of Atlantic salmon, when the trees on the banks of the Miramichi River burst into brilliant yellows and reds. Keith Wilson is the sixth-generation owner of the lodge, and some of his guides have worked there since the 1950s. The 16 pools at Wilson's include some of the best water on the Miramichi.

Weekly rate: $4,200. 877-365-7962, http://www.wilsonscamps.nb.ca/

FULL LINK

Sunday, May 2, 2010

Louisiana...

We've all heard about the tragedy going on in the Gulf...

Be sure to check out the Coalition To Restore Coastal Louisiana's website to find ou how you can help out...

WEBSITE




Video from Flies & Fins...

Weekly Update

Well another week…another sap story…

Rains were supposed to bring in the last run of fresh fish…but unfortunately was unable to deliver. The rivers dropped after a nice rain early in the week, and temps were set up to keep temps nice and lower…

Unfortunately the fish didn’t come as hoped, and we’ve ended the season with a bust. No fish for me…

Bassing was to be the back up plan for the days I fished, but with cooler temps, we struggled to find active fish. Fish landed, but the fishing wasn’t spectacular…

Weekend was a bust fishwise with an impromptu trip to Baltimore…

Next weekend was supposed to be another bust with a trip back home to CT for Mother’s day…but then I remembered the Farmington…


High & Muddy at the top of the week...

Finn doing his check up on the water...

Late day bass from the week...